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REGULATIONS

The Minister of Agriculture, in terms of Section 43 and after consideration and approval of relevant recommendations by the Council, made the regulations which can be accessed by clicking on the relevant button.  It is advisable to read these regulations in conjunction with the relevant sections in the Act and also refer to any rules that may apply.

Training - Veterinarians

Training - Veterinary Nurses

Training - Veterinary Technologists

Training - Animal Health Technicians

Monitoring Standards of Training

These regulations pertain to the minimum requirements for undergraduate training of veterinarians and para-veterinarians and includes the minimum requirements for registration in each category.

Kindly note that there are currently no minimum standards for regulation of the training for Laboratory Animal Technologists

These regulations pertain to :

- the election of members of Council and consists mainly of the direction as to how the election should be conducted and what is required of nominees.

- the prescribed qualifications for registration in each category.  These regulations and those pertaining to application and maintenance of registration are included on the same web page.

-Particulars of students

-Summons at inquiries

-Payment of Fees -Table 1- Fees Payable

-Offences and Penalties

-Table 2- Qualifications for registration as a Veterinarian

-Table 3-Qualifications for registration as a Veterinary Specialist

-Table 4-Qualifications for registration to practise a Para-Veterinary Profession

-Table 5-Entries in Registers

-Table 6-Minimum requirements for Veterinary degree subject courses

-Table 7-Minimum requirements for Veterinary nurse diploma subject courses

-Table 8-Minimum requirements for Animal Health Diploma/ Degree

-Table 9-Minimum requirements for Veterinary Technologist

-Annexure A-Nomination of a candidate for an election of members of the South African Veterinary Council

-Annexure B-Declaration by a person casting a vote during an election of members of the South African Veterinary Council

-Annexure C-Summons to appear at an inquiry

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

DEPARTMENT VAN LANDBOU

No. R. 863 1 September 2006

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCT STANDARDS ACT, 1990 (ACT No. 119 OF 1990)

REGULATIONS REGARDING THE CLASSIFICATION AND MARKING OF MEAT INTENDED FOR SALE IN THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA



The Minister of Agriculture has under section 15 of the Agricultural Product Standards Act, 1990 (Act No. 119 of 1990) --

(a) made the regulations in the Schedule; and

(b) repealed the regulations published by Government Notice No. R. 342 of 19 March 1999, as amended by Government Notice No. R. 4 of 5 January 2001.

SCHEDULE

Definitions

1. In these regulations, any word or expression to which a meaning has been assigned in the Act shall have that meaning and, unless the context otherwise indicates --

"abattoir" means a slaughter facility as defined in the Meat Safety Act;

"abattoir-identification code" means a code used in the roller-mark of carcasses as well as on stamps in the case of pig carcasses, to identify the abattoir of origin of the carcass;

"age classification" means the classification of a carcass in respect of age in the manner set out in regulation 6;

"calf” means a bovine -

(a) with a carcass mass up to a maximum of 100 kg of which only the first real molar has erupted in the upper jaw; or

(b) of which the first real molar has not yet erupted in the upper jaw;

"carcass" means the remaining part of a bovine, sheep, goat or pig after the blood thereof has been drained and the hide, skin, hair, entrails, pluck, head, tail, hooves and trotters, according to the customs in respect of a particular kind of animal as well as the diaphragm, sex organs and udder have been removed, and also --

(a) such a carcass that has been divided length-wise in two parts along the spinal column thereof; and

(b) a part referred to in paragraph (a), that has been divided into two approximately equal portions;

"conformation classification" means the classification of a carcass in respect of conformation in the manner set out in regulation 8 or regulation 8 as applied by regulation 13;

"container" means the immediate wrapping in which meat is packed for sale;

"damage classification" means the classification of a carcass in respect of damage in the manner set out in regulation 9 or regulation 9 as applied by regulation 14;

"fatness classification" means the classification of a carcass in respect of fatness in the manner set out in regulation 7;

"fat thickness" with regard to a pig carcass, means the thickness of the back fat including the skin, as determined in the manner contemplated in regulation 12;

"imported" means any cuts, whole carcasses or parts of carcasses originating from bovines, sheep, goats or pigs which have not been slaughtered in the Republic of South Africa;

"independent qualified person" means an individual who has been trained and successfully assessed by the Assignee in the classification and marking of carcasses in terms of the requirements of these regulations and who has no association, either directly or indirectly, with the abattoir concerned;

"ink" means any colouring as described in the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act No. 54 of 1972)

"mass" with regard to a carcass, means the mass to the nearest kilogram as determined at the time of classification;

"meat" means those parts of a carcass which are normally sold for human consumption;

"no fat" means no indication of visible subcutaneous fat on a carcass;

"outer container" means the carton or case which contains one or more containers of meat;

"percentage meat" with regard to a pig carcass, means the meat content of a carcass after removal of the head, jowls, trotters, skin, subcutaneous fat, kidneys and kidney fat, tail and bone, expressed as a percentage of the carcass without the head, jowls, trotters, kidneys and kidney fat and tail;

"responsible person" means any individual, partnership, corporation, association or any other business unit that is in possession or in charge of an abattoir;

"subcutaneous fat percentage" means all the visible fat of a carcass that can be removed, expressed as a percentage of the chilled carcass mass;

"the Act" means the Agricultural Product Standards Act, 1990 (Act No. 119 of 1990); "the Meat Safety Act" means the Meat Safety Act, 2000 (Act No. 40 of 2000); and

"trademark" means a word or expression registered at the Executive Officer on written request to use in a roller-mark.

Restriction on the sale of meat

2. (1) Nobody shall, subject to the provisions of subregulations (2) and (3), sell meat in the Republic of South Africa --

(a) unless such meat is derived from a carcass which has been classified according to a class in terms of regulation 4 or 10;

(b) unless such carcass complies with the standards or other characteristics of such classes as contemplated in these regulations;

(c) unless the prescribed requirements regarding the marking of the carcass in terms of regulations 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20 have been complied with;

(d) unless the prescribed requirements regarding the marking of imported meat in terms of regulation 21 have been complied with; and

(e) if such carcass, container or outer container has been marked or stamped with particulars and in a manner so prescribed as particulars with which it may not be marked or stamped.

(2) This prohibition is only applicable to --

(a) the sale of meat of carcasses obtained from animals which have been slaughtered at an abattoir in respect of which an abattoir-identification code in terms of regulation 3(3)(a) has been allocated; and

(b) the sale of meat of carcasses which have been marked with any mark, symbol or other method of expression that is or purports to be an indication of a class thereof.

(3) The Executive Officer may exempt someone in writing, either totally or in part, on the conditions which the Executive Officer deems necessary, from the stipulations of subregulation (1).

Abattoir-identification code

3. (1) An abattoir-identification code for use in the roller-marking of a carcass is allocated by the Executive Officer to the responsible person of an abattoir upon written application: Provided that -

(a) the abattoir has at its disposal a registration certificate issued in terms of the Meat Safety Act; and

(b) the abattoir has at its disposal the services of an independent qualified person.

(2) Such a code shall only be used in the abattoir to which it has been allocated.

(3) (a) If an abattoir-identification code has been allocated to an abattoir, all carcasses of a species originating from that abattoir shall be classified and roller-marked if 40 and more of that specific species are slaughtered per month.

(b) A period of grace of not more than three months after the allocation of an abattoir-identification code shall be allowed with regard to the implementation of the classification and roller-marking for each species of which 40 and more of that specific species are slaughtered at the abattoir.

(c) The responsible person of an abattoir which is registered according to the provisions of subregulations (1), (2) and (3)(a) and (b) must have at all times, a complete, updated inventory of all roller-mark equipment available for inspection and is also responsible for the safekeeping of all such roller-mark equipment.

(4) The Executive Officer may withdraw an abattoir-identification code if --

(a) the roller-marking of carcasses is not implemented within the time limit as specified in subregulation (3)(b);

(b) the abattoir concerned does not classify or roller-mark any carcasses during any 30 day period, excluding the grace period stated in subregulation (3)(b);

(c) the abattoir does not have at its disposal the services of an independent qualified person;

(d) the marking and classification of carcasses, to the judgement of the Executive Officer, are not done in accordance with the Regulations;

(e) the registration certificate issued in terms of the Meat Safety Act has been withdrawn; or

(f) the abattoir does not pay the fees as set out in section 3(1A) of the Act, to the Assignee within 30 days.

(5) When an abattoir-identification code is withdrawn in terms of subregulation (4), all roller-mark equipment must, within 48 hours after such withdrawal, be handed over to the nearest Police Station for collecting by the Assignee, or be handed over directly to the Assignee, for safekeeping until —

(a) the abattoir apply for the same or a new abattoir identification code, as the case may be, in terms of subregulation (1); or

(b) the responsible person decides to disperse the roller-mark equipment to another abattoir that has been authorized to classify carcasses.

(6) An abattoir only has to apply for a new abattoir-identification code in terms of subregulation (1) in cases where such withdrawal has taken place in terms of subregulation (4)(d).

(7) The responsible person must inform the Executive Officer or Assignee within 48 hours when there is any change at the abattoir of the independent qualified person.

(8) In case an abattoir loses the services of the independent qualified person or discontinue meat classification permanently, the Executive Officer as well as the Assignee must be informed within 24 hours and all roller-mark equipment must be handed over within 24 hours to the nearest Police Station for collecting by the Assignee, or be handed over directly to the Assignee, for safekeeping.

(9) Equipment and instruments which is used to classify and roller-mark meat may only be supplied by the Assignee.

(10) In case any losses of roller-mark equipment are observed, the responsible person of the abattoir must within 48 hours -

(a) inform the Assignee or Executive Officer of such losses and also report the case to the Police; and

(b) apply at the Executive Officer for a new abattoir-identification code.

(11) All carcasses, of which 40 or more of a specific species are slaughtered per month, originating from an abattoir to which an abattoir-identification code has been allocated, must be classified and, excluding pig carcasses, also be roller-marked in the abattoir.

CLASSIFICATION OF CALF, BOVINE, SHEEP AND GOAT CARCASS CHARACTERISTICS

Classes of caff, bovine, sheep and goat carcasses

4. (1) The carcass of a calf, bovine, sheep or goat shall be classified as a class in terms of regulation 5.

(2) The classification of a carcass shall --

(a) in the case of a calf, be done on the whole carcass or on a side thereof;

(b) in the case of a bovine, be done on the whole carcass or on a side thereof or, where the carcass has been damaged to such an extent that the side has been quartered, on a quarter thereof; or

(c) be done on the whole carcass.

(3) The classification shall take place on the day of slaughter.

Standards for classes

5. (1) The carcass of a bovine, sheep or goat shall be classified according to --

(a) age as the age classes A, AB, B or C in accordance with the provisions of regulation 6;

(b) fatness as the classes 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 in accordance with the provisions of regulation 7;

(c) conformation as the classes 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 in accordance with the provisions of regulation 8; and

(d) damage as the classes 1, 2 or 3 in accordance with the provisions of regulation 9.

(2) The carcass of a calf shall be classified according to -

(a) age as the class "Calf";

(b) conformation as the classes 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 in accordance with the provisions of regulation 8; and

(c) damage as the classes 1, 2 or 3 in accordance with the provisions of regulation 9.

Determination of age classification

6. (1) Subject to the provisions of subregulation (2), (3) and (4) the carcass of a bovine, sheep or goat that ---

(a) has no permanent incisors, shall be classified as "Age Class A";

(b) has at least one but not more than two permanent incisors, shall be classified as "Age Class AB";

(c) has at least three but not more than six permanent incisors, shall be classified as "Age Class B; and

(d) has more than six permanent incisors, shall be classified as "Age Class C".

(2) The carcass of a bovine, sheep or goat of which the head is not available for determination of age classification shall be deemed to be a carcass of Age Class C.

(3) The carcass of a young bovine of which the head is not available for determination of the age classification shall be deemed to be the carcass of a bovine of Age Class A unless the person performing the classification is satisfied that it is the carcass of a calf.

(4) All carcasses that are slaughtered at a registered abattoir must at all times, for the purpose of age classification, be identifiable with the head of such a carcass either by identifying each separate carcass and head with a corresponding number or mark or by means of an acceptable method which is acceptable to the Executive Officer and Assignee.

Determination of fatness classification

7. (1) The carcass of an animal as stipulated in column 1 of Table 1 of the Annexure that could, on the basis of a visual evaluation or calculation of the subcutaneous fat distribution thereof, be described as specified in column 2 opposite thereto, may in respect of fatness be classified as the class referred to in column 3 opposite the description concerned.

(2) A description contemplated in subregulation (1) may in the case of a chilled carcass represent a subcutaneous fat layer with a thickness as specified in column 4 of Table 1 opposite the description concerned that --

(a) in the case of a bovine, is measured between the tenth and eleventh ribs and 50 mm from the midline of that carcass; or

(b) in the case of a sheep, is measured between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae and 25 mm from the midline of that carcass.

(3) A description contemplated in subregulation (1) may in the case of a chilled carcass represent a percentage subcutaneous fat as specified in column 5 of Table 1 opposite the description concerned.

(4) In the case of bovine and sheep carcasses any visible fat situated on the following area of the carcass shall be ignored when determining the fatness class:

(a) Bovine carcass: Around the root of the tail and pelvic cavity within a radius of 100 mm.

(b) Sheep carcass: Around the root of the tail and pelvic cavity within a radius of 50 mm.

Determination of conformation classification

8. The carcass of an animal as stipulated in column 1 of Table 2 of the Annexure that could, on the basis of a visual evaluation of the conformation thereof, be described as specified in column 2, may in respect of conformation be classified as the class referred to in column 3 opposite the description concerned.

Determination of damage classification

9. (1) The carcass of a calf, bovine, sheep or goat which is damaged to such an extent that, with due regard to the locality, extent and depth of the damage, the fat-to-meat-to-bone ratio of such a carcass --

(a) is disturbed to a slight extent only, shall be classified as Class 1 in respect of damage;

(b) is moderately disturbed, shall be classified as Class 2 in respect of damage; or

(c) is severely disturbed, shall be classified as Class 3 in respect of damage.

CLASSIFICATION OF PIG CARCASS CHARACTERISTICS

Classes of pig carcasses

10. (1) Pig carcasses shall be classified as "Sucking pig", "Class P", "Class O", "Class R", "Class C", "Class U", "Class S", "Sausage pig" or "Rough".

(2) The classification of a pig carcass shall be done on the whole carcass or on a side thereof.

(3) The classification shall take place on the day of slaughter.

Standards for classes

11. (1) A pig carcass with a mass of 20 kg or less shall be classified as the class "Sucking pig".

(2) A pig carcass with a mass of 20,1 kg or more but not more than 100 kg, shall be classified as a class as stipulated in column 1 of Table 3 of the Annexure, if the calculated percentage meat of the carcass is as specified in column 2 of the table opposite the class concerned.

(3) A pig carcass with a mass of 100,1 kg or more shall be classified as the class "Sausage pig".

(4) A pig carcass shall be classified as "Rough" if --

(a) it is a carcass of conformation class 1;

(b) on appearance, it shows conspicuously poor breeding characteristics;

(c) it is an emaciated carcass;

(d) the skin thereof appears conspicuously thick and rough; or

(e) the fat thereof appears excessively oily.

Determination of percentage meat

12. (1) The percentage meat of a pig carcass shall be calculated after --

(a) the fat thickness and muscle thickness have been measured by means of an electronic thickness meter; or

(b) the fat thickness has been measured by means of an intrascope, between the 2nd and 3rd last rib and 45 mm from the midline of the carcass while the carcass is in a hanging position.

(2) The percentage meat is calculated, depending on the technique, by means of the following formulae (fat thickness and muscle thickness in mm):

Percentage meat electronically = 72.5114 - (0.4618 x fat thickness) + (0.0547 x muscle thickness)

Percentage meat with intrascope = 74.4367 - (0.4023 x fat thickness)

(3) The result of a calculation set out in subregulation (2) shall be rounded to the last integer before a carcass is classified.

Determination of conformation classification

13. The classification of a pig carcass in respect of conformation is performed according to the provisions of regulation 8.

Determination of damage classification

14. The classification of a pig carcass in respect of damage is performed according to the provisions of regulation 9.

G06-076672—B

MARKING OF CARCASSES

Stamp marks

15. (1)(a) Each carcass characteristic as stipulated in column 1 of Table 4 of the Annexure to which a class has been allocated in column 2 shall be marked on the carcass concerned, with a stamp mark as indicated in column 3 opposite that class.

(b) A stamp mark shall be applied in the colour of ink referred to in column 4 of the mentioned table, opposite the stamp mark concerned and where applicable in the manner as set out in column 5.

(c) All stamp marks shall be applied on the day of slaughter.

(2) (a) Each carcass of a bovine, sheep or goat shall be marked with an indication of the number of permanent incisors.

(b) The indication shall, in the case of --

(i) bovine, be marked with an indelible ink pencil on both sides of the atlas vertebra, and be stamped on the carcass with a stamp in the appropriate colour of ink as set out in column 4 of Table 4 of the Annexure, opposite "Age" in column 1 of the table mentioned; and

(ii) sheep and goats, be marked with the ink colour representing the age class on the left hind shank, and be stamped on the carcass with a stamp in the appropriate colour of ink as set out in column 4 of Table 4 of the Annexure, opposite "Age" in column 1 of the table mentioned.

(3) (a) The carcass of a boar as well as of a barrow showing signs of late castration shall be identified with the stamp mark "M/D".

(b) The carcass of a ram or a bull as well as of a hamel, a kapater or an ox showing signs of late castration and which has been classified as Age class AB, Age class B or Age class C, shall be identified with the stamp mark "M/D".

(4) In case of a pig carcass, the abattoir-identification code must be applied on each side of the carcass with a stamp or indelible ink pencil, in the immediate vicinity of other stamp marks mentioned in these regulations, with purple ink.

Ink marks

16. (1) The carcass of a ram or bull which has been classified as Age class AB, Age class B or Age class C, shall be marked with black ink on the following area:

(a) Ram: On the rear end of the right hind shank.

(b) Bull: On the front end of the right front shank.

(2) The indication shall be applied at the same point on the slaughter line as where the age determination is done.

Roller-marking of carcasses

17.(1) Each carcass which has been classified as contemplated in these regulations must be roller-marked over the full length of each side or quarter thereof with the particulars prescribed for the kind of animal concerned.

(2) Each carcass shall be roller-marked on the day of slaughter.

(3) The roller-mark must comply with the following requirements:

(a) All the letters and figures in the roller-mark must be of the same type and size

(b) The vertical height of the letters and figures in the roller-mark must be minimum 6 mm and maximum 8 mm.

(c) The space between the rows of letters and figures must be 6 mm.

(d) The width of the roller-mark must be between 28 and 29 mm, or between 42 and 43 mm.

(e) The roller-mark ink must be spread evenly over the whole length of the roller-mark.

(4) The carcass of a calf, bovine, sheep or goat may also be roller-marked with a separate roller-mark that consists of the expression "HALAL", "KOSHER" or "KOSJER".

Roller-marking of bovine, sheep and goat carcasses

18. (1) Each bovine, sheep or goat carcass which has been classified as contemplated in these regulations must be roller-marked --

(a) on both sides of the carcass;

(b) 50 mm from and parallel to the centre of the carcass in the case of a sheep or goat carcass;

(c) 80 mm from and parallel to the centre of the carcass in the case of a bovine carcass; and

(d) from the hind shank end across the back of the carcass up to the neck.

(2) The roller-mark for a bovine, sheep or goat carcass must indicate the following:

(a) Age class.

(b) Fatness class.

(c) Abattoir-identification code.

(3) The roller-mark must, in the case of the carcass of --

(a) a bovine or sheep that has been classified as age class –

(i) A, be applied with purple ink;

(ii) AB, be applied with green ink;

(iii) B, be applied with brown ink; and

(iv) C, be applied with red ink.

(b) a goat, be applied with orange ink.

(4) The age class of a bovine, sheep or goat carcass must, in the case of age class --

(a) A, be indicated by the symbols "AAA";

(b) AB, be indicated by the symbols "ABAB";

(c) B, be indicated by the symbols "BBB"; and

(d) C, be indicated by the symbols "CCC".

(5) The fatness class of a bovine, sheep or goat carcass must, in the case of fatness class -

(a) 0, be indicated by the symbol "000";

(b) 1, be indicated by the symbol "111";

(c) 2, be indicated by the symbol "222"

(d) 3, be indicated by the symbol "333";

(e) 4, be indicated by the symbol "444";

(f) 5, be indicated by the symbol "555"; and

(g) 6, be indicated by the symbol "666".

(6) (a) The twelve rows of symbols in the roller-mark for a bovine, sheep or goat carcass are composed as follows:

(i) The age class must appear at least four times.

(ii) The fatness class must appear at least four times.

(iii) The abattoir-identification code must appear at least four times.

(b) If a trademark does appear in the roller-mark, the twelve rows of symbols in the roller-mark must be composed as follows:

(i) In the case where the trademark consist of two rows and the abattoir- identification code of two rows, the age class must appear three times, the fatness class three times, the trademark two times and the abattoir- identification code once, alternatively, in the roller-mark.

(ii) In the case where the trademark consist of two rows and the abattoir- identification code of one row, the age class must appear three times, the fatness class three times, the trademark two times and the abattoir- identification code two times, alternatively, in the roller-mark.

(iii) In the case where the trademark consist of one row and the abattoir- identification code of two rows, the age class must appear three times, the fatness class three times, the trademark two times and the abattoir- identification code two times, alternatively, in the roller-mark.

(iv) In the case where the trademark consist of one row and the abattoir- identification code of one row, the age class must appear three times, the fatness class three times, the trademark three times and the abattoir- identification code three times, alternatively, in the roller-mark.

Roller-marking of calf carcasses

19. (1) The roller-mark for a calf carcass must indicate the following:

(a) Age class.

(b) Abattoir-identification code.

(2) In the case of a calf carcass --

(a) the roller-mark must be applied with brown ink; and

(b) the age class must be indicated by the alternating symbols "CALF" and "KALF".

(3) (a) The twelve rows of symbols in the roller-mark for a calf carcass are composed as

follows:

(i) The age class must appear at least eight times.

(ii) The abattoir-identification code must appear at least four times.

(b) If a trademark does appear in the roller-mark, the age class has to appear at least six times and the abattoir-identification code has to appear at least four times.

Roller-marking of pig carcasses

20. (1) Pig carcasses may be roller-marked with the following particulars:

(a) Abattoir-identification code.

(b) A trademark.

(2) If pig carcasses are roller-marked, the roller-mark must be applied with purple ink.

MARKING OF MEAT

Imported meat

21. (1) Each outer container of meat which is imported into the Republic of South Africa shall be marked with the following particulars:

(a) The country of origin of the meat;

(b) generic identification; and

(c) the type of cut, date of packing and net weight of the meat.

(2) When imported meat destined for sale in the retail trade is packed in containers, each such a container shall be marked with the expression "imported from" or "ingevoer vanaf", followed by the name of the country or origin.

(3) The container of each quantity of imported meat that is sold in the retail trade may only be marked with a corresponding indication of the age class if the carcass of origin has been classified according to these regulations or according to similar classification regulations of the country of origin.

(4) The particulars referred to in subregulations (1), (2) and (3) shall be indicated in detached letters -

(a) that are clearly legible; and

(b) of which the vertical height is at least 2 mm.

(5) When imported meat destined for sale in the retail trade is displayed loose, the expression "imported from" or "ingevoer vanaf", followed by the name of the country of origin, shall be indicated in clearly legible letters with a vertical height of at least 10 mm on a notice board in the immediate vicinity of such meat.

(6) A whole or half a carcass of a bovine, sheep and goat which is imported into the Republic of South Africa may only be marked with a corresponding indication of the age class and/or fatness class if the carcass has been classified according to these regulations: Provided that -

(a) such indications are applied by means of a roller-mark, as determined by regulations 17, 18 and 19; and

(b) the country of origin be indicated at least two times in the roller-mark.

Use of the expressions "lamb" and "kid"

22. (1) The expression "lamb" may only be used in the sale of mutton that has been classified according to these regulations as Age Class A.

(2) The expression "kid" may only be used in the sale of goat's meat that has been classified according to these regulations as Age Class A.

Restricted particulars

23. (1) No mark, roller-mark or other method of expression that directly or by implication constitutes a misrepresentation shall be marked on a carcass, container or outer container of meat;

(2) The words "super", "prime", "prima", "top", "choice", "keur", "quality", "kwaliteit", "extra", "ekstra" or "ultra" or any other word or expression which directly or by implication creates or may create the impression that meat or a carcass is of a special or particular quality other than a characteristic referred to in these regulations, may not be marked on the container of meat or stamped on a carcass.

GENERAL

Offences and Penalties

24. Any person who contravenes or fails to comply with the provisions of these regulations shall be guilty of an offence and upon conviction be liable to a fine or to imprisonment in accordance with item 11 of the Act.

ANNEXURE

TABLE 1

FATNESS CLASSIFICATION OF BOVINE, SHEEP AND GOAT CARCASSES

(Reg. 7)

Kind of animal Description of carcass in: respect of fatness Fatness Class Guideline for the determination of the thickness of the subcutaneous fat layer(mm) Guideline for the percentage subcutaneous fat
1 2 3 4 5
Bovine No fat 0 Nil Less than 1.0
Very lean 1 Less than 1 At least 1.0 but not more than 3.6
Lean 2 At least 1 but not more than 3 More than 3.6 but not more than 5.6
Medium 3 More than 3 but not more than 5 More than 5.6 but not more than 7.6
Fat 4 More than 5 but not more than 7 More than 7.6 but not more than 9.6
Slightly overfat 5 More than 7 but not more than 10 More than 9.6 but not more than 11.7
Excessively over- fat 6 More than 10 More than 11.7
Sheep No fat 0 Nil Less than 1.0
Very lean 1 Less than 1 At leat 1.0 but not more than 5.6
Lean 2 At least 1 but not more than 4 More than 5.6 but not more than 8.6
Medium 3 More than 4 but not more than 7 More than 8.6 but not more than 11.6
Fat 4 More than 7 but not more than 9 More than 11.6 but not more than 14.6
Slightly overfat 5 More than 9 but not more than 11 More than 14.6 but not more than 17.6
Excessively over- Fat 6 More than 11 More than 17.6/Meer as 17.6
Goat No fat 0 Nil *

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

Very lean Maer 1 *

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

*

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

Lean 2 *

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

*

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

Medium 3 *

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

*

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

Fat 4 *

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

*

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

Slightly overfat 5 *

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

*

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

Excessively over- fat 6 *

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

*

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

TABLE 2

CONFORMATION CLASSIFICATION OF BOVINE, SHEEP, GOAT AND PIG CARCASSES

(Reg. 8)

Kind of animal Description of carcass in respect of conformation Beskrywing van karkas ten opsigte van bouvorm Conformation class
1 2 3
All species Very flat 1
Flat 2
Medium 3
Round 4
Very round 5

TABLE 3

CLASSES FOR PORK CARCASSES/KLASSE VIR VARKKARKASSE

(Reg. 11)

Class Calculated percentage meat of carcass # Fat thickness measured by means of an intrascope (mm)
1 2 2
Sucking pig *

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

*

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

P 70 and more At least 1 but not more than 12
O At least 68 but not more than 69 More than 12 but not more than 17
R At least 66 but not more than 67 More than 17 but not more than 22
C At least 64 but not more than 65 More than 22 but not more than 27
U At least 62 but not more than 63 More than 27 but not more than 32
S 61 and less More than 32
Sausage pig *

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

*

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

Rough *

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

*

Footnote

 

* Not specified/Nie gespesifiseer nie

#

With due regard to regulation 12(3)/Met inagneming van regulasie 12(3)

TABLE 4

STAMP MARKS

(Reg. 15)

Carcass characteristics Class Stamp mark Colour of ink Method of stamping
1 2 3 4 5
Calf [Reg. 5(2)] Calf A Brown With a double impression of the stamp mark
Age (bovine, sheep and goat [Reg. 6] A A Purple In the case of a bovine carcass with a stamp mark on each quarter
AB AB Green
B B Brown
C C Red
Fatness (bovine, sheep and goat)[Reg. 7] 0 0 Purple In the case of a sheep carcass with a fat tail with a double impression of the stamp mark; in the case of a bovine carcass with a stamp mark on each quarter
1 1 Purple
2 2 Purple
3 3 Purple
4 4 Purple
5 5 Purple
6 6 Purple
Conformation (bovine, calf and pig) [Reg. 8 and 13] 1 1 Green In the case of a bovine and calf carcass with a stamp mark on each side and in the case of a pig carcass with a stamp mark on one side
2 2 Green
3 3 Green
4 4 Green
5 5 Green
Damage (all species) [Reg. 9 and /en14] 1 1 Brown Shall be stamped in such a way as to indicate the damaged area
2 2 Red
3 3 Black
Masculinity (all species) [Reg. 15(3)] Male M Black In the case of a bovine carcass with a stamp mark on each side; in the case of a sheep and goat carcass with a stamp mark on one side in the immediate vicinity of the other stamp marks; in the case of a pig carcass with a stamp mark on each side
Sucking pig [Reg. 11(1)] Sucking pig S Purple On forehead
Percentage meat (pigs) [Reg. 11 (2)] P P Purple On each side in all the cases
O O Purple
R R Purple
C C Purple
U U Purple
S S Purple
Sausage pig [Reg. 11(3)] Sausage pig W Purple One stamp mark on each but-tock
Rough [Reg. 11(4)] Rough RU Black One stamp mark on each side

Department of Agriculture

No. R. 338  7 April 2006

ANIMAL DISEASES ACT, 1984

(ACT No. 35 OF 1984)

CONTROL MEASURES RELATING TO CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER IN A CERTAIN AREA



I, Angela Thokozile Didiza,  Minister of Agriculture, acting under section 9(1) of the Animal Diseases Act, 1984 (Act No. 35 of 1984), hereby prescribe the control measures set ourt in the schedule.

(Signed)

A.T. DIDIZA,

Minister of Agriculture

SCHEDULE

Definitions

1. In this Schedule any word or phrase to which a meaning has been assigned in the Act, shall have that meaning and unless  the context otherwise indicates -

"the Act" , means the Animal Diseases Act, 1984 (Act No. 35 of 1984); and

"the Regulations", means the Animal Diseases Regulations as published by Government Notice No. R.2026 of 26 September 1986, as amended by Government Notices No.s R.2208 of 24 October 1986, R.266 of 13 February 1987, R.2343 of 16 October 1987, R.884 of 5 May 1988 (as corrected by Government Notice No. R.1043 of 3 June 1988), R. 394 of 1 March 1991 (as corrected by Government Notice No. R.931 of 3 May 1991), R. 2358 of 10 December 1993, R.1023 of 27 May 1994, R.254 of 6 February 1997, R. 1136 of 11 September 1998, R. 361 of 7 April 2000, R. 443 of 25 May 2001, R. 885 of 21 September 2001  (as corrected by Government Notice No. R. 1386 of 21 December 2001), R.962 of 11 August 2004 and R. 144 of 17 February 2005 (as corrected by Government Notice No. R. 167 of 25 February 2005).   

Objective of control measure

2. The objective of this control measure is to get rid of prevent the spreading of classical swine fever (also called European Swine Fever or Hog Cholera and hereinafter refer to as Classical Swine Fever) in pigs, wild pigs, bushpigs and warthogs form the area specified in the table -

(a)    to prohibit the export of pigs, wild pigs, bushpigs and warthogs, as well as any of their products and genetic materials, from such area; and

(b)    to prohibit the movement of pigs, wild pigs, bushpigs and warthogs, as well as any of their products and genetic materials, except on authority of a permit from such area.

Prohibition on the export pigs, wild pigs, bushpigs and warthogs , as well as any of their products and genetic materials from a certain area

3. No pigs, wild pigs, bushpigs and warthogs, nor any of their products and genetic materials may be exported from the area specified in the table.

Prohibition on the movement of pigs, wild pigs, bushpigs and warthogs , as well as any of their products and genetic materials, except on authority of a permit

4. (1) No pigs, wild pigs, bushpigs and warthogs, nor any of their products and genetic materials may be moved from the area specified in the table, except under the authority of a permit contemplated in regulation 20 (1) of the Regulations.

(2) The permit referred to in subregulation 2 (b) and 4 (1) may be issued only for pigs, wild pigs, bushpigs and warthogs, as well as any of their products and genetic materials, that are certified to be free of Classical Swine Fever to the satisfaction of the director referred to in section 2 (1) of the Act.

(3) Any exemption in terms of Regulations 11 (2) (a) and (b) may be granted only subject to written approval of the director referred to in section 2(1) of the Act.

TABLE

The following area:

Whole of Eastern Cape Province

GOVERNMENT NOTICES


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


No. R. 370


26 April 2007


ANIMAL DISEASES ACT, 1984 (ACT No. 35 OF 1984)


CONTROL MEASURES RELATING TO CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER IN A CERTAIN AREA:


RESCISSION


I, Lulama Xingwana, Minister of Agriculture, acting under section 9 (1) (d) of the Animal Diseases Act, 1984 (Act No. 35 of 1984),

hereby rescind the control measures relating to Classical swine fever in a certain area as prescribed in Government Notice No. R.338 of 7 April 2006.


Lulama. Xingwana


Minister of Agriculture


No. R. 371    26 April 2007


ANIMAL DISEASES ACT, 1984 (ACT No. 35 OF 1984)


REGULATIONS: AMENDMENT


I, Lulama Xingwana, Minister of Agriculture, acting under section 31 of the Animal Diseases Act, 1984 (Act No. 35 of 1984), hereby make the regulation hereunder.


Lulama Xingwana


Minister of Agriculture


SCHEDULE Definitions


1 In this Schedule any word or phrase to which a meaning has been assigned in the Act, shall have that meaning and unless the context otherwise indicates -


"the Act", means the Animal Diseases Act, 1984 (Act No. 35 of 1984); and    


"the Regulations", means the Animal Diseases Regulations as published by Government Notice No. R. 2026 of 26 September 1986, as amended by Government Notices Nos. R. 2208 of 24 October 1986, R.266 of 13 February


1987, R. 2343 of 16 October 1987, R.884 of 5 May 1988 (as corrected by Government Notice No. R. 1043 of 3 June 1988), R. 394 of 1 March 1991 (as corrected by Government Notice No. R. 931 of 3 May 1991), R.2358 of 10 December 1993, R.1023 of 27 May 1994, R. 254 of 6 February 1997, R.1136 of 11 September 1998, R.361 of 7 April 2000, R. 443 of 25 May 2001, R.885 of 21 September 2001 (as corrected by Government Notice No. R. 1386 of 21 December 2001), R. 162 of 24 February 2006, R. 163 of 24 February 2006, R. 864 of 1 September 2006 (as corrected by Government Notice No.R. 1059 of 27 October 2006) and R. 204 of 16 March 2007.


Amendment of Table 1 of the Regulations


2 Table 1 of the Regulations is hereby amended by


(a) the deletion of the entry in respect of the controlled animal disease "Rabies";


(b) the insertion after the entry in respect of the controlled animal
disease "Foot and mouth disease" of the following:


3. European swine fever / The eastern part of the Eastern Cape


Province described Classical swine fever / Hog as follows: cholera


(a) The whole of the District Municipality of O.R Tambo.


(b) The eastern portion of the District Municipality of Chris Hani including the following local municipalities: Engcobo, Intsika Yethu, Emalahleni and Sakhisizwe.


(c) The eastern portion of the District Municipality of Amathole including the following local municipalities: Mbashe, Mnquma and that portion of the local

municipality
of Amahlathi north east of the Kei River


(d) The southern portion of the District Municipality of Alfred Nzo including those portions of the local


municipality of Umzimvubu
that lie between the N2 and the north-western border of the District Municipality of O. R. Tambo.


Amendment of Table 2 of the Regulations

3 Table 2 of the Regulations in the English text is the hereby amended by the substitution of the "European swine fever" in column 1 for the animal disease of the following: "European swine fever / Classical


swine fever / Hog cholera"


Lulama Xingwana


Minister of Agriculture

PLEASE COPY AND  E-MAIL  OR FAX THE FEES SURVEY TO THE SAVC BEFORE THE END OF JANUARY 2009                                                      
South African Veterinary Council

The President

Vaccination of puppies, 2008-06-07  

The Council objectives:

(e) to encourage and promote efficiency in and responsibility with regard to the practice of the veterinary professions;

(f) to protect the interests of the veterinary professions and to deal with any matter relating to such interests;

(g) to maintain and enhance the prestige, status and dignity of the veterinary professions; and

(h) to advise the Minister in relation to any matter effecting a veterinary profession and the success with the ban on tail dockings urges me to approach Council.

A future scenario is that veterinarians will not be involved with most vaccinations of puppies (and kittens) with the development of new generation vaccines, unless they enhance their role, e.g. by promoting themselves as an independent party to a transaction that entails a change of ownership, increasing the value of the veterinary vaccination certificate and vouching for disease in the immediate period after sale. I am committed to reduce the suffering of companion animals and place a proposal before you with a request that you work for the proposed amendment to the Animals Protection Act s 2 (r) (or any other act that you and your legal advisors are convinced is better, for instance a consumer act).

The proposal is set out in detail under the title:

Legislation to empower buyers of puppies and to reduce suffering by puppies.

I later added explanations to the proposal to lobby other veterinarians under the titles:

Praktiese gevolge. “Practical Implications”

Reduce suffering by increasing the value of pets.

Increasing the value of pets

Would you give your serious consideration,

Dr. Douw G. van der Nest

LEGISLATION TO EMPOWER BUYERS OF PUPPIES AND TO REDUCE SUFFERING BY PUPPIES.

The unnecessary suffering of many puppies, as well as the grief of pet owners and their children can be reduced and is my motivation to ask your action. Puppies suffer severely before dying of distemper and catflu, the most important causes of death amongst dogs, and most of these deaths are in dogs that fall ill just after sale.

Puppies with catflu that receive intravenous fluids for 5 days in hospital at an astronomical cost endure an intense suffering before recovery, while some of them experience a lingering death despite the best treatment. The suffering by less privileged companion animals is even more.

The importance of vaccinating the dam.

The different organ systems of a puppy complete development at different ages:

At two weeks the nervous system as the eyes and ears open, at weaning the intestinal tract, at twelve weeks the immune system and at puberty the reproductive system.

When the immune system is fully developed a couple of weeks after birth, own antibodies can be formed after exposure or preferably after vaccination. But before that time, a puppy is vulnerable, unless it receives maternal antibodies from the dam, mainly via the colostrum to protect it against diseases, some of which is life threatening. The chances for protection of the puppies during the first 9 to 20 weeks of life by transferred maternal antibodies is significantly better if the dam of the pups has high levels of antibodies herself. Therefore is it essential that a dam be regularly vaccinated, especially during the twelve months that precedes partus.

The importance of the first vaccination of the puppy as the level of the maternal antibodies drops.

The level of maternal antibodies in a puppy is dependant on the amount received and the decay.

The amount of maternal antibodies received is dependent on:

- the level of antibodies of the dam,

- the volume colostrum received - some dogs get nothing, e.g. if the dam dies during partus or if she has milkfever before or during partus, while

- the runts of litters get less than their littermates and

- absorption of suckled maternal antibodies: the intestinal tract must not be “ sealed “ by the feeding of a milk mixture (to prevent dehydration and hypoglycemia during an extended partus or during the recovery period after a Caesarean section), before suckling colostrum.

The rate of decay of the maternal antibodies varies in different dog breeds and varies for antibodies against the antigens of different diseases.

Puppies get susceptible to diseases as the level of maternal antibodies drop. The result is that different dog breeds get susceptible at different ages and that a dog gets susceptible to different diseases at different times.

In summary, puppies become susceptible at different ages to different diseases depending on the amount of antibodies received from the dam and the rate of decay of the maternal antibodies, which varies depending on the disease and the breed of dog. As the level of maternal antibodies against a certain disease lowers, then a vaccination is needed to stimulate the puppy’s own immune system for the production of own antibodies without getting ill.

The breeder, whom is mostly the seller, is obliged to care.

It is better that the breeder takes the puppies for their first vaccination as the breeder can best supply information to the veterinarian regarding the dams vaccination history, the suckling of colostrum, the suckling of colostrum before “sealing” of the intestinal tract and the incidence of diseases. With the information a veterinarian can work out the most optimal vaccination program for the individual puppy. The veterinarian must stimulate the immature immune system at the most optimal age and for antibody production against only the imperative diseases, because the vaccination against less critical diseases will divide the “ attention “ of the immune system. Examples of choices regarding the inclusion of antigens at the first vaccination are inter alia: vaccination with only measles virus in Rottweilerpups, if the dam has been thoroughly vaccinated and the inclusion of corona virus in case of enteritis epidemics. Examples when even the “ attention “ of the fully developed or adult immune system is divided to much or put differently, when the capacity of the immune system is exceeded (with a weaker acquired immunity resulting), are vaccinating with all the strains of the horsesicknessvirus or bluetonguevirus at the same time.

The point that needed to be stressed is that the breeder must have the puppies vaccinated to increase the survival rate of sold puppies, because:

-         the breeder can supply useful information at vaccination to plan an optimal vaccination program with regard to the timing of the vaccination and the diseases against which to vaccinate and

-         the puppies are in the possession of the breeder at that age.

Sellers of puppies can reduce the incidence of distemper and catflu in puppies significantly by:

- Regular vaccinations of the dam and especially vaccinating her during the twelve months preceding pregnancy, so that the maternal antibodies can protect the puppies during the first 9 to 20 weeks of their lives and

- The first vaccination of the puppies before 8 weeks of age.

The buyer of a puppy is surrendered for the first few weeks to the actions or negligence of the seller. In the case of a negligent seller, the earliest protection that the buyer can obtain for the puppy by immediately vaccinating the puppy after getting possession is two weeks after the vaccination.

Legislation can bring about an enormous improvement and everybody, i.e. the dogs, buyers, veterinarians, dog breeder’s associations and good breeders will gain. The only losers are the cruel breeders that do not love dogs, but money. They are too lazy to work and want to make money out of animals. Costs are cut to the bone and their selling prices are on par with the prices of the good breeders. The increased profit is not justifiable in the light of the greater risk for dogs and buyers.

Suggested solution.

Would you include a section in the law that reads as follow:

“ A seller of a puppy, for money or any other value, is liable and accountable for any veterinary costs for the diagnosis and treatment of distemper or catflu and for the replacement value in case of death due to distemper or catflu, if the distemper or catflu is diagnosed to be incubating or raging with observable clinical disease during the three week period after sale, unless the seller gives proof at sale by way of a veterinary certificate that the dam has been vaccinated during the twelve months preceding partus and that the puppy received its first vaccination before 8 weeks of age and if the puppy is sold after 9 weeks of age and before 7 months of age, that the puppy received prescribed follow-up vaccinations punctually while in the possession of the seller.“

A legal advisor formulated the proposed section as follow:

“ 1.    Liability and accountability of a Seller towards the new Owner:

1.1.A Seller will be liable and accountable towards a new Owner with regard the following:

a)       any veterinary cost for the diagnosis and treatment of distemper and catflu, if the distemper or catflu is diagnosed to be incubating or raging with observable clinical disease during the three week period after sale and/or

b)       the replacement value of the animal if it dies from one of (a) above-mentioned diseases.

1.2.The Seller will be exempt of liability and accountability if the Seller gives prove at sale by way of a veterinary certificate that:

a)      the dam has been vaccinated during the twelve months preceding partus and

b)      the puppy received its first vaccination before 8 weeks of age and

c)      if the puppy is sold after 9 weeks of age and before 7 months of age, the puppy received prescribed follow-up vaccinations punctually while in the possession of the seller.”

It might be necessary to include the following definitions in the law:

-         a seller is any person that supply a puppy to another person for money or any other value

-         a new owner includes persons that buy a puppy for money or any other value

-         distemper is a disease caused by an infection with distemper virus

-         catflu is a disease caused by an infection with parvovirus.

The seller will be liable and accountable in accordance with such a section, unless reasonable preventative actions were taken by the seller to take care of his responsibility towards the buyer. In other words, a seller that gives proof of vaccinations at sale cannot be held liable and accountable even if a puppy falls ill. Some puppies might still fall ill, but if the seller has taken all actions that a reasonable person can, then the seller cannot be held responsible.

Practical documentary evidence is a legal veterinary vaccination certificate as required by act 19 of 1982. The purpose of legal veterinary vaccination certificates at the moment is proof of vaccination of:

a) the dam of a puppy that is being sold,

b) a puppy being sold,

c) a dog participating in a show or competition,

d) a dog attending training and

c) rabies.

The section will empower the consumer or rather the buyer of a puppy to make a case with the support of his lawyer against a negligent seller. Even more, it will not only create an opportunity of a remedy and recourse through the court, but the sanction as spelled out in the section make the settlement out of court a possibility. Only a few cases where a seller was negligent and a dog infected with distemper or catflu can create a new culture amongst sellers.

Explanation of specific points.

A dog can contract either distemper or catflu, but sometimes both at the same time. Is “or” or  “and” correct between the two words in the different sentences?

The idea of the words: for money or any other value is to include people who give a puppy to an employee in lieu of money, disguise payment as a donation, etc.

The reason for keeping the responsibility for three weeks after sale (a verifiable time) with the seller is the causal relationship between the actions or negligence of the seller and the incidence of distemper and catflu during the three weeks:

1) Sellers of puppies can reduce the incidence of distemper and catflu in puppies during the three weeks after sale significantly by:

Regular vaccinations of the dam and especially vaccinating her during the twelve months preceding pregnancy, so that the maternal antibodies can protect the puppies during the first 9 to 20 weeks of their lives and

The first vaccination of the puppies before 8 weeks of age.

2) Sellers can deliver an incubating sick puppy, which might only show clinical signs 18 days after sale. (The incubation period, the time from exposure to the observance of clinical signs is 14 to 18 days for distemper and 6 days for catflu).

Most first vaccinations are administered at 6 weeks of age, but in some instances another age is more optimal. When the puppy might have received no or little maternal antibodies (as explained above) an earlier vaccination is recommended and in some instances, for example when a Rottweiler dam has been thoroughly vaccinated, it might be advantageous to the offspring if their first vaccination is administered only at 8 weeks of age. These different possibilities are accommodated, by legislating for the first vaccination before 8 weeks of age.

The norm is that puppies are sold at 6 weeks of age, i.e. after the first vaccination. Some is sold at 9 weeks of age for better socialization before separation from the dam and siblings, also after the first vaccination. Possibly all vaccination programs prescribe a second vaccination at 9 weeks of age which increases the protection dramatically. The optimal protection of the puppy is continued if a seller keeps the puppy in possession after the age of 9 weeks by punctually vaccinating the puppy as prescribed for a second time. The phrase: “if the puppy is sold after 9 weeks of age and before 7 months of age, the puppy received prescribed follow-up vaccinations punctually while in the possession of the seller.” prevents sellers to circumvent responsibility.

Legislation of other countries.

I understand that such legislation exists in other countries, but we in South Africa can create our own legislation. In the “ Code of recommendations and minimum standards for the sale of companion animals” of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries of New Zealand you will note on p. 14 that: “ Animals should be vaccinated prior to sale.” We can write it better and include a sanction, namely that the seller is liable and accountable for veterinary costs and replacement value with the result that fewer cases will have to go to court and for better protection of the poor.

Praktiese gevolge / practical implications

'n Amendament in die wet sal van ontskatbare waarde wees vir almal, onder andere vir nuwe generasies troeteldier-eienaars. 'n Belangrike lewenswaarde word gekoester, nl. die kosbaarheid van lewe, ook die lewe van geselskapsdiere. Die teenpool as ons die amendament nie deurvoer nie, is:

'n Dogtertjie huil oor haar nuwe hondjie wat dood is vanwee katgriep 2 weke na aankope en haar ouers vervang inderhaas die hondjie. Die lessie is beslis nie dat lewe kosbaar is nie.    

Die goeie teler./ The good breeder

'n Hondjie word gekoop op 6 weke oud en tydens die transaksie:

- toon die teler die veterinere inentingsertifikaat van die moederhond aan die koper wat aantoon dat die moederhond ingeent is en

- oorhandig die teler die veterinere inentingsertifikaat van die hondjie wat aantoon dat die hondjie ingeent is.

Die hondjie sterf twee weke na die transaksie van parvovirus-infeksie, maar die koper het geen eis teen die verkoper van die hondjie nie, aangesien die teler as redelike persoon alles menslik moontlik gedoen het om parvovirus-infeksie te voorkom.

Die swak teler./ The poor breeder

'n Hondjie word gekoop op 6 weke oud en tydens die transaksie:

- toon die teler nie die veterinere inentingsertifikaat van die moederhond aan die koper wat aantoon dat die moederhond ingeent is of

- oorhandig die teler nie die veterinere inentingsertifikaat van die hondjie wat aantoon dat die hondjie ingeent is.

Die hondjie sterf twee weke na die transaksie van parvovirus-infeksie. Die koper het 'n eis teen die verkoper.

Die koper nader sy prokureur en maak 'n saak teen die verkoper. Sommige kopers sal 'n saak maak om hulle geld te wil verhaal, maar baie kopers sal in die belang van diere 'n saak maak, aangesien baie mense emosioneel geraak is as hul en hul kinders se hondjie sterf. Die koper se prokureur sal die diagnose van die veearts as bewys aanvoer. Die bewys is in die vorm van die veearts se veterinere sertifikaat en/of beedigde verklaring. Die bewys sal onderskraag wees as parvovirus-infeksie bevestig word deur 'n laboratorium- of histopatologie-verslag. (Die veearts lewer die dienste teen 'n fooi.) Die verkoper skik deur die veterinere koste en die vervangingskoste, sowel as die prokureurskoste te betaal. As die koper nie wil skik nie, gaan die saak na die hof. Die veearts mag geroep word as kundige getuie om 'n diagnose uit te spreek. Die pers mag verslag doen oor die saak. Tien uitsprake ten gunste van kopers, sal veroorsaak dat meeste sake daarna in die toekoms geskik word sonder die betrokkenheid van 'n prokureur, aangesien die wet die sanksie uitspel, d.i. die wet stel dit duidelik dat die verkoper die veterinere koste en die vervangingskoste moet betaal. 'n Nuwe kultuur sal ontstaan. Geen afdwinging is nodig deur die SANPD, DBV of KUSA nie, aangesien die sake nie kriminele sake behoort te wees nie, maar siviele sake.
Reduce suffering by increasing the value of pets.

People must have compassion towards all animals and value their pets. A minority of people values their pets so much that they view them as companion animals.

Most vets differ from most other people in that they value animals highly (and thus value their services highly as well).

Certain people do not attach much emotional value to their pets and do not regard them as companion animals. A starting point to influence their attitude and behaviour is to increase the economical value of pets.

An example of the different views people have about dogs is John Farmer whose boerbulls are only watchdogs. John always has 5 dogs on the farm: every year five puppies are born and 5 older dogs die; (bear in mind that it is the normal cycle of life that plays itself out on all farms with regard to animals). John gives all pale dogs a shot of phenamidine. The non-responders with “woeste borsluiskoors” (ehrliciosis is unknown to John) might even get a follow-up shot. It makes John’s day to point one of the dogs out to a visiting vet and say: “ Sien jy daardie hond? Hy was nog nooit by ‘n veearts nie.” During the 1994 transition, i.e. at the height of the farm attacks, he and some other farmers found that young guard dogs were not as reliable and decided to do the unusual. They took their ill guard dogs to a pet vet to ensure that some guard dogs survive to become experienced guard dogs. But those are forgotten days.

John’s son, Maplotter Farmer is working in the city and striving towards his dreams on a smallholding. He is going to get rich as a breeder and inherit half the farm.

John’s other son, Butch Farmer is a suburban South African and his new neighbour is A.N.C. Farmer. They are potential clients of a pet vet. His guard dog cross children’s pet (comparable to a multi-purpose vehicle: 4 x 4 bakkie cross sportscar), called Scramble, gets placed on the pet vet consultation table, after it has fallen ill with “gatgriep” at 8 weeks of age, it is 2 weeks after being bought. The decision is between hospitalisation for 4 days at R 1 600 or euthanasia. The deciding factor is the price that was paid to acquire Scramble and the price to acquire a Scramble II. The price of a dog features twice in the formula. The eyes of his children and wife are fixed on Butch, while his brain is inconspicuously in overdrive to do a few calculations. If we had helped to increase the price of acquiring dogs, it will be easy for Butch to step to the fore as the hero in the story and ask the vet very politely to do everything possible for Scramble. The next generation, family and friends will hear about Butch's love for companion animals. An increase in economical value of pets will have created an opportunity for the hero to experience a new feeling towards companion animals; he now senses the emotional value. The ripple effect will inspire many others in a myriad of ways to follow the hero. The ripple effect will mainly benefit animals, but also good breeders and veterinarians.

The new neighbour, A.N.C. Farmer need not experience this phase, if we increase the value.

The punch line: Reduce the suffering by increasing the economical value of pets and thereby increasing the emotional value of companion animals.

Increasing the value of pets.

The most important way to increase the economical value is to increase the price to acquire a pet. Legislate that the seller of a puppy has to prove at sale with a veterinary vaccination

certificate that the dam has been vaccinated in the year before whelping and that the puppy has been vaccinated before 8 weeks of age. I have put my detailed proposal to amend animal welfare legislation (that resorted under the Department of Justice) in a document under the title: “Legislation to empower buyers of puppies and to reduce suffering by puppies”. Good breeders already do exactly what is proposed. Unscrupulous breeders and puppy farmers, who haven’t vaccinated, pretend to have vaccinated or have vaccinated the puppies themselves charge the same price for puppies as the good breeder and make a bigger profit at the cost of puppies suffering. A veterinarian issuing a veterinary vaccination certificate acts as a third party to a sale transaction of a pet and reduces suffering by:

a)      decreasing the incidence of distemper and catflu in dogs and

b)      increasing the price of acquisition.

Legislation must also be passed to reduce suffering in cats with regard to snuffles (caused by FHV I, calicivirus and clamydia) and feline leukaemia caused by FeLV. Clients are devastated after buying a pedigree kitten with snuffles, especially after receiving a pathology report (a week or two after acquiring a kitten) stating that the FeLV infection is in the fifth stage of development and that the kitten has a 2 – 3 year life expectancy. The breeders are aggressive in their response towards the buyers. The breeders with multiple queens are not interested to make the financial sacrifice to rid their catteries of snuffles and FeLV. The majority of catteries harbour these diseases and vets are not involving themselves.

Suffering can be reduced by the stroke of a pen in parliament. The involvement of an independent party that certifies vaccination as proof of vaccination will reduce suffering. Only a few veterinarians will need to supply proof of infection by means of laboratory tests and histopathology as evidence in a couple of cases where the seller did not act as a reasonable person to cultivate a new culture amongst sellers of pets.

Please comment on matters under discussion

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2008/09 PLEASE COPY AND This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. OR FAX (012) 342 4354

THE FEES SURVEY TO THE SAVC BEFORE THE END OF JANUARY 2009

1. Is your practice situated in a low, medium, high or mixed income area

Low Income

Medium Income

High Income

Mixed Income

2. If your practice is in a mixed income area do you have different fee structures? YES / NO

3. If, YES, how do you charge out for various groups?

4. Do you use the SAVC Guideline of Tariffs in setting your fees, or your unique practice and its costs or a combination?

Use Guidelines

Unique practice and own costs

Combination

5. How long have you been in practice?

0 > 5 years

5 > 10 years

10 > 20 years

20 > 30 years

30 > 40 years

40 + years

6. Does this influence your pricing?    YES  /  NO

7. Is your practice Mixed, Production Animals, Companion Animals, Equine or other?

Mixed

Production

Companion

Equine

Other: Specify

8. Would you consider the standard of your facility as below average, average or above average?

Below average

Average

Above average

9. Do you give your clients a written estimate before carrying out procedures? YES / NO

10. Do you take the affordability into account when charging clients with varying abilities to pay? YES /NO

11. Do you often use time related fee charging in your practice YES /NO

12. If applicable how do you arrive at your Travelling fee charged to clients

13. Are there any comments you want to make on the Current Fees Guideline as published by the S.A.V.C


Specific Fees charged. Please fill in where applicable

Procedure

Fee Range

Average

Comments

Consultation

Companion Animal

Consultation

Production Animal

Consultation

Equine

Professional Time

Per hour

Surgical Time

Per hour

Annual Vaccination

Small Animals

Blood Slide Exam

Caesarean Section

Cattle

Caesarean Section

Bitch -all in fee

Cruciate Repair

All in fee

Dental Prophylaxis

ex anaesthesia

Ear clean

Femur Pinning

Surgery alone

General anaesthesia

with intubation

General anaesthesia maintenance

Oophorectomy

Canine

Oophorectomy

Feline

Rumenotomy

Cattle

Setting up and admin of  fluids

Spinal Surgery

Surgery alone

Travelling fee

Per km

Ultrasound Scan

Reproductive

Production Animals

Ultrasound Scanning Abdomen

Urine analysis

Pricing structure for medicines

Links to African Council websites

Veterinary Statutory Bodies in Africa
http://www.rr-africa.oie.int/en/RC/en_vsbs.html

Veterinary Council of Namibia
http://www.van.org.na/section.php?secid=10

Veterinary Council of Zimbabwe (department of livestock and veterinary services)
http://www.dlvs.gov.zw/

Kenya Veterinary Board
http://kenyavetboard.org/

Veterinary Council of Tanzania
http://www.mifugouvuvi.go.tz/vertinary-council-of-tanzania/

Botswana Veterinary Association
http://www.bva.org.bw/bva_content.php?id=2

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